Breann Y.S. Nuʻuhiwa

Breann Y.S. Nuʻuhiwa

Breann Y.S. Nuʻuhiwa

Counsel | Dentons

Breann Nu’uhiwa is a member of the Public Policy and Regulation practice and the Native American Law and Policy practice, which serves clients on matters related to American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian issues. Breann has extensive experience advising and advocating for Native communities in Tribal, state, and federal forums, with a focus on labor and employment matters, energy development, water rights, and self-governance. In addition to providing strategic policy and legal counsel to Native governments and corporations on all aspects of governance and operation, Breann’s practice includes: drafting Tribal, state, and federal legislation and related advocacy documents; negotiating intergovernmental and other complex agreements and tariffs; drafting Tribal policies and developing related administrative frameworks; conducting internal investigations; and training government and corporate personnel on regulatory and other compliance matters.

 

Prior to joining Dentons, Breann served as Deputy Staff Director (118th Congress) and Senior Counsel (117th Congress) for the majority on the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. There, she led the team’s labor, energy, water, gaming, public lands, and self-governance portfolios and assisted with management of all aspects of the Committee’s legislative, oversight, and nominations activities. During her tenure with the Committee, Breann played an instrumental role in advancing Native equities through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act) and the Inflation Reduction Act, and guiding multiple historic water bills through the legislative process to enactment.

 

Breann’s prior experience also includes more than a decade of direct service to Native communities as in-house counsel to Tribal governments and corporate enterprises in California and Arizona, and as Chief Advocate of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, where she managed federal, state, and local advocacy for the semi-autonomous Native Hawaiian trust/state agency.